Anacostia Watershed Blog

Thank you to our members and supporters!

As a special thanks we made you watershed valentines to share

Anacostia Watershed Society members and supporters are the reason we have been able to sustain remarkable progress towards a swimmable and fishable Anacostia River!  Thank you so much for everything you do to help us protect and restore the river and our neighborhood parks and streams. 

As a special thank you from us, and on behalf of the critters you help protect, we made some #WatershedWildlife themed valentines for you to share on February 14!  We hope you enjoy them!

mussel valentine

bee valentine

Fairland Park - Help us investigate the source of the pollution

By: Masays Maeda, AWS Water Quality Specialist

Short version: We need citizens to help us find the source of the pollution at the pond at Fairland Park. If you see vehicle (or RV in particular) illegally emptying into the pond, please take photos and send them to Masaya Maeda at mmaeda@anacostiaws.org.

The pond in the Fairland Recreational Park is polluted.  Our friend, Jeff Goldman, contacted us on August 20, 2016 by email.  Apparently, he had been reporting the pollution to various agencies and his email was desperate.

What I know about the Anacostia River

By Eva K. Sullivan

This post is republished with permission from  https://evaksullivan.com/2016/09/25/what-i-know-about-the-anacostia-river

What I know about the Anacostia is what others will find out soon, when the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail bike path opens in about a month. This DDOT video shows how the last segment of the trail moves north, up through Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, under the New York Avenue bridge, toward Bladensburg Waterfront Park, where it will connect DC to Prince Georges County and to Montgomery County via the Northwest Branch Trail.

The Anacostia River is in a real estate boom, and we need smart development to protect how healthy it has become

By: Jim Foster, AWS President


Nationals Stadium, August 2009

Yesterday's Washington Post reported that the area of the Navy Yard and the Southwest Waterfront, both on the Anacostia River, is the 5th-busiest submarket for rental development in the entire United States. 

Recovery in Action: What Anacostia River Wetland Restoration Looks Like

By: Jorge Bogantes Montero and Maureen Farrington


Bladensburg Wetlands, from August, 2016. Click on pic to open full size in a new tab.

This blog post is a round-up of the wetland restoration posts that appeared on the Anacostia Watershed Society Facebook page through the summer.

It's REI's #UnitedOutside Free Weekend in DC!

Help AWS by doing what you love outdoors

We have certainly been talking a lot about REI's #UnitedOutside campaign this summer! There is just so much to choose from with the activities that we wanted to highlight some special events. Here at AWS we are especially excited about series of free events happening this weekend, July 16-17, and we want to make sure that our community knows about these great opportunities! 

Paddling and Kayaking

It might be on that "other river" but it's a great chance to hone your skills for the Anacostia River!

How About Giving Up Plastic Bags for Lent?

Today marks the start of Lent, a 40 day period that Christians use for personal reflection in preparation for Easter. As part of that reflection, many people give up something that they feel is inhibiting their lives – alcohol, chocolate and other sweets are some of the most popular things to “give up.” If you’re looking for something unique that will be good for you and good for the community, how about giving up plastic shopping bags. 

Why give up the bag? A major study conducted by AWS found that plastic bags make up at least 21% of trash in the Anacostia River. These bags clog storm drains, cause flooding, are harmful to wildlife, and are virtually impossible to clean up.

Capstone Projects of the Watershed Stewards Academy

Watershed Stewards of the National Capital Region 

By Vaughn Perry


Stewards pose for a picture in front of their capstone project at First United Methodist church.

We are so excited to see improvements coming to the Anacostia River! An excellent article, linked below, from the District Source highlights several plans for land and river access developments.
 

Development Means Positive Attention for the Anacostia Riverfront

By: Shaun Courtney, District Source

Diapers, Needles, and Cans. Oh My!

Q&A with Masaya Maeda about the Nash Run Trash Trap


By Mattie Lehman, AWS Public Policy and Advocacy Intern

Each year lotus and lily blooms at the Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens (KAG) in Northeastern DC attract large numbers of nature lovers and photographers to view the flowers, wildlife, and unique aquatic plants that make up the marsh area. Thanks to the efforts of the Anacostia Watershed Society, one view visitors do not see is the trash that once plagued the Gardens.

Upstream, the Nash Run Trash Trap operated by AWS stops and collects litter which previously would have made its way towards KAG and ended up in the Anacostia River. The Trap began as a joint project of AWS and the District of Columbia Department of Energy and Environment in February 2009. Since that time, AWS has continued to maintain the trap and installed an updated version in 2011 designed by Masaya Maeda, AWS Water Quality Specialist.