Anacostia Watershed Blog

 600 Pairs of Helping Hands Work to Restore the River’s Wetlands

By Maddie Koenig, AWS Environmental Educator

This spring the Anacostia Watershed Society (AWS) had the pleasure of working with more than 600 students from 13 different schools across the watershed!    

Treating and Teaching: Stormwater Stewardship 

A model program to engage students, teachers, and groundskeepers in Prince George’s County

By Tara Baker, Chesapeake Bay Trust; Edited by Maureen Farrington

students in the yard

The Prince George’s Department of the Environment (DoE) recognizes that schools are key sites for stormwater management projects because they have large parking lots and roof tops that create a high volume of stormwater runoff. Schools are also central hubs for citizens and students, making them ideal demonstration sites for public awareness. Therefore, schools provide a unique opportunity for Prince George’s County to connect the stormwater projects installed on school grounds with the environmental curriculum that supports the State’s Environmental Literacy graduation requirement.

Call For Artists:

17th Street Storm Drain Project to Promote LGBTQ Neighborhood Identity

Stormdrains AWS painted in 2014 in Brookland

Description

AWS is seeking artists to create designs and paint murals on storm drains along 17th Street NW. The goal of these murals is to both raise awareness of storm drains as a connection to our local waterways and promote the neighborhood’s LGBTQ identity. Selected artists will receive a commission of $775 per storm drain. Materials (paint, brushes, etc) are provided outside of the artist's commission. The Anacostia Watershed Society will help coordinate volunteers for painting the project. Designs are due by 5pm on June 16th. Mural installation will take place in late June/early July 2017.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THIS INFORMATION AS A PDF.

Specifications

A Reason to Be Glad: Springtime Means Shad!

By: Chris Lemieux, Manager of Education


Video of Shad running at Buzzard Point on March 28, 2017

As the Spring warm-up is well under-way, so is the annual run of the American Shad! The newly-minted “DC state fish” spends most of its life in the ocean, but as your garden is beginning to bloom, the shad make their way back up our local rivers to spawn.

Up until the late 1800’s this fish was a major part of colonial life and a huge component of a thriving native ecology as well as colonial-American industry. But Shad fell victim to the neglect and mistreatment of the Anacostia River, and the numbers of this fish dwindled from over-fishing, pollution, and loss of prime spawning habitat.


Students release shad fry into the Anacostia River.

Anacostia Watershed Society Submits Comments on Anacostia Park Draft Management Plan

Encourages NPS to Maximize Natural Area, Natural Systems

(Washington, DC, March 17, 2017) -- The Anacostia Watershed Society this week submitted detailed comments to the National Park Service in response to the Anacostia Park Draft Management Plan.

AWS expressed support for Alternative 4 as the best plan for Anacostia Park because it preserves the most natural area and allows for the least intrusive management practices on National Park land. AWS supports Alternative 4 because it achieves the highest and best use of National Park land to return, restore and protect the natural environment for the use of all, including future generations. AWS did note some ambiguity between the text and the maps, and made clear that AWS does NOT support the transfer of Poplar Point to the District of Columbia for commercial development.

Among the specific comments offered by AWS:  

Thank you to our members and supporters!

As a special thanks we made you watershed valentines to share

Anacostia Watershed Society members and supporters are the reason we have been able to sustain remarkable progress towards a swimmable and fishable Anacostia River!  Thank you so much for everything you do to help us protect and restore the river and our neighborhood parks and streams. 

As a special thank you from us, and on behalf of the critters you help protect, we made some #WatershedWildlife themed valentines for you to share on February 14!  We hope you enjoy them!

mussel valentine

bee valentine

Fairland Park - Help us investigate the source of the pollution

By: Masays Maeda, AWS Water Quality Specialist

Short version: We need citizens to help us find the source of the pollution at the pond at Fairland Park. If you see vehicle (or RV in particular) illegally emptying into the pond, please take photos and send them to Masaya Maeda at mmaeda@anacostiaws.org.

The pond in the Fairland Recreational Park is polluted.  Our friend, Jeff Goldman, contacted us on August 20, 2016 by email.  Apparently, he had been reporting the pollution to various agencies and his email was desperate.

What I know about the Anacostia River

By Eva K. Sullivan

This post is republished with permission from  https://evaksullivan.com/2016/09/25/what-i-know-about-the-anacostia-river

What I know about the Anacostia is what others will find out soon, when the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail bike path opens in about a month. This DDOT video shows how the last segment of the trail moves north, up through Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, under the New York Avenue bridge, toward Bladensburg Waterfront Park, where it will connect DC to Prince Georges County and to Montgomery County via the Northwest Branch Trail.

The Anacostia River is in a real estate boom, and we need smart development to protect how healthy it has become

By: Jim Foster, AWS President


Nationals Stadium, August 2009

Yesterday's Washington Post reported that the area of the Navy Yard and the Southwest Waterfront, both on the Anacostia River, is the 5th-busiest submarket for rental development in the entire United States. 

Recovery in Action: What Anacostia River Wetland Restoration Looks Like

By: Jorge Bogantes Montero and Maureen Farrington


Bladensburg Wetlands, from August, 2016. Click on pic to open full size in a new tab.

This blog post is a round-up of the wetland restoration posts that appeared on the Anacostia Watershed Society Facebook page through the summer.